Images of bombs caused outrage after they appeared on the Internet today (Photo: Telegram)

Bombs smeared with distorted quotes from UkraineAs it was reported, the performance of “Eurovision” in Mariupol stopped.

Kaluga Orchestra won the competition with the song Stephanie, which in recent weeks has become a popular anthem of Ukrainians.

During yesterday’s performance, the band asked the whole world to “help Maripula” and “help Azovstali now”.

Frontman Oleg Psyuk added: “I ask all of you to help Ukraine.”

Mariupol is almost entirely in Russian hands, with the exception of several hundred Ukrainian fighters, who continue to stay at the Azovstal metallurgical plant.

Today there were images of bombs intended for the city, which were stolen by Russian soldiers.

Expressions “Help Mariopol” “Help Azovstal” now.

It is reported that the military claims that they perform “at the request” of the Kaluga Orchestra.

The Kaluga Orchestra won the contest with the song “Stephanie” last night (Photo: AP)
Russia responded by writing ominous reports about a set of bombs destined for Ukraine (Photo: Telegram)

Other images published in the Telegram messaging program show bombs with the mocking inscription “Eurovision-2022” on the side.

Adviser to the mayor of Mariupol Peter Andryushchenko shared pictures of Russian bombs on his own Telegram channel.

He said Putin’s forces had “lost their humanity”.

And on the Internet, pro-Kremlin writers, outraged by Ukraine’s victory, called Eurovision a “freak” and “all fake.”

One Russian journalist even “joked” that the contest should have been bombed by a Satan rocket.

Azovstal plant crucial in battle for Mariupol (Photo: EyePress News / REX / Shutterstock)
Ukrainian fighters remain in metallurgical plants, refusing to surrender (Photo: AFP)

President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky has promised today to hold Eurovision song contest in Mariupol. Next year.

He said: “Our courage impresses the world, our music conquers Europe.

“Ukraine will host Eurovision next year.”

Mariupol, the shell of the city it once was, is almost entirely under Russian control, and the metallurgical plant is under repeated attacks.

Only this morning there was an untested video of phosphorous bombs falling over the object.

In the clip you can see how several “sparks” erupt, consisting of individual ammunition.

Ukrainian officials claim that Russian forces used incendiary shells 9M22C with a combustion temperature of about 2-2.5 thousand degrees Celsius.

Adviser to the mayor of Mariupol Peter Andriushchenko said that experts will assess the area to determine the nature of the attack.

Soldiers of the metallurgical plant, hidden in its maze of tunnels, used the victory at Eurovision last night as a necessary boost of morale.

They wrote in the Telegram: “Thank you to the Kalush Orchestra for your support! Glory to Ukraine! ‘

The band members will return to Ukraine on Monday after receiving a special permit to leave the country to participate in the contest.

The port city of Mariupol was subjected to intense attacks by Russian troops (Photo: Reuters)
Kaluga Orchestra of Ukraine won after a big wave of international support (Photo: AFP)

In a recent update, Mr Zelensky said Ukrainian forces had made progress in the east, regaining six towns and villages over the past day.

And Ukraine “probably won the battle of Kharkiv,” analysts say Russian troops continue to withdraw from the country’s second largest city.

In his nightly speech on Saturday, Mr Zelensky said that “the situation in the Donbas remains very difficult” and that Russian troops “are still trying to emerge victorious to some extent”.

But he added: “Step by step we are forcing the occupiers to leave the Ukrainian land.”

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Russians write sick Eurovision message on bombs destined for Ukraine

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