Subaru cautiously returns: RAY MASSEY gets behind the wheel of the new flagship all-wheel drive station wagon Outback

  • It has driver assistance technology that monitors your eyes and issues warnings
  • It is well equipped with driver assistance and comfort, including heated and electrically adjustable seats

Remember Subaru? There was a time when this unusual Japanese cult carmaker did everything from white rally Impreza to practical SUVs.

Then he seemed to disappear.

Well, now he is making a cautious and restrained return, updating his range.

And I just drove for a long time in my first Subaru, in the new flagship all-wheel drive station wagon Outback. This is the sixth generation since the model was launched in 1995.

Tested and trusted: the updated Subaru is filled with the latest technology

This was a significant change from most cars – but in a positive way. I like the sturdy look and chunky exterior that flows to the solid leather steering wheel.

Definitely a safe pair of hands. It has vision driver assistance technology that keeps an eye on your eyes and warns you if you nod or don’t look at the road ahead. He also received high scores in crash tests and warns of pedestrians or cyclists who are at risk. Most of the functions of satellite navigation and infotainment system are performed through the 11.6-inch central screen.

It is well stocked with aids and amenities for the driver, including heated and electrically adjustable seats, electric tailgate without hands, downhill control, voice recognition and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

There are three trim levels for the Outback range, ranging from Limited from £ 34,070 to Touring for £ 39,499.

I was riding on a mid-range field priced from £ 38,070. It sits at a high level with 213 mm – or almost 8½ inches – ground clearance and can tow up to 2 tonnes.

Its horizontally opposite or “boxer” petrol engine is connected to the Lineartronic continuous transmission (CVT). It is a decent drive, accelerates smoothly and copes well with bumps. But acceleration from 0 to 62 mph is an uninteresting 10.2 seconds, to a top speed of 120 mph.

Fuel economy also averages 33 miles per gallon. And I kept looking for the “sport” button. There are none. I felt like Subaru missed the trick. But overall I enjoyed the experience.

Will it fit in my garage? New all-wheel drive Subaru Outback 2.5i Boxer Field Lineartronic

Price: £ 38,070

Length: 4870 mm

Width: 1875 mm

Height: 1670 mm

Wheelbase: 2745 mm

Ground clearance: 213 mm

Wheels: 18 inches

Equipped weight: 1646 kg

Engine: 2.5i Horizontal-Opposite (Boxer) 4-inch, 4-stroke petrol

Transmission: Stepless Lineartronic transmission (CVT) (8-speed manual transmission on the steering wheel).

About up to 62 mpg: 10.2 seconds

Maximum speed: 120 miles per hour

Average fuel consumption: 33 miles per gallon

CO2 emissions: 193 g / km

Towing capacity: 2 tons

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Seats: 561 liters

Folding seats (with sunroof): 1750 liters

Seats folded (without hatch): 1822 liters

Fuel tank: 63 liters

Finishing level: Limited (£ 34,070), Field (£ 38,070) and Touring (38,070)

Features

– Vision aid technology (monitors your eyes and warns you if you nod or be distracted).

– 11.6-inch center screen, similar to a tablet.

– heated and electrically adjustable seats

– trunk gate with automatic control

– control on the descent from the slide

– voice recognition

– Apple Car Play and Android Auto.

Subaru’s relatively low key role in recent years is partly due to the decision to recall some of its more aggressive sports and rally-willing models – such as the much-loved Impreza WRX line – so that it can comply with increasingly stringent emission rules.

Along with the Outback, Subaru’s current lineup includes: a hybrid Forester e-Boxer from £ 36,410; a hybrid compact crossover XV e-Boxer from £ 31,730; and the new all-electric Solterra crossover is now on sale from £ 49,995.

They are imported to the UK by Midlands-based International Motors, with which it has been associated for more than four decades.

London, Northern Ireland and the West Midlands are the worst for road rage

Stay away from London, Northern Ireland and the West Midlands if you want to avoid the rage on the road.

According to a new study by the road safety charity IAM RoadSmart, these three areas are the most vicious drivers in the UK.

Angry driver: stay away from London, Northern Ireland and the West Midlands if you want to avoid the rage on the road

Angry driver: stay away from London, Northern Ireland and the West Midlands if you want to avoid the rage on the road

Londoners are much hotter: 58 percent of drivers in the capital are angry at other drivers when they make mistakes, equivalent to 1.4 million drivers (out of 2.5 million).

It is followed by motorists from Northern Ireland (45 per cent) and the West Midlands (44 per cent), followed by south-east (42 per cent), Wales (41 per cent), Yorkshire (39 per cent) and the east of England. (39 percent). On the contrary, Scottish drivers are the calmest.

Londoners are also more likely to signal to a motorist who is driving too slowly, and Welsh motorists are less likely to do so.

Do you get angry at other drivers when they make mistakes?
Region Often
London
Northern Ireland
Western Midlands
Southeast
Wales
Yorkshire
East of England
Southwest
Eastern Midlands
Northeast
Northwest
Scotland
Source: www.iamroadsmart.com
58%
45%
44%
42%
41%
39%
39%
37%
37%
36%
33%
32%
How likely are you to yell at a driver who is driving too slow in front of you?
Region Probably
London
Southeast
Scotland
Western Midlands
East of England
Northeast
Northwest
Yorkshire
Northern Ireland
Southwest
Eastern Midlands
Wales
Source: www.iamroadsmart.com
56%
25%
23%
22%
22%
22%
21%
20%
20%
20%
14%
10%

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