The SaaS Gain.pro platform, which provides investment information to private firms, raised $ 10 million (£ 8.1 million) in its late round of initial funding.

Fresh capital came from previous investors, industry leaders, the investment department of the European Family Office, the founders, the management team and employees.

Gain.pro will use the funding to expand the reach of private companies, launch new product features and to expand its commercial and engineering teams.

Headquartered in Amsterdam with offices in London, Gain.pro is a tool for investors to find, learn about and monitor companies. Its software uses automation in data collection and analysis.

“More than ever, investors and advisors need deep visibility of the private market. Coming from this industry, we really needed a better solution. With Gain.pro, we have created a product that we would like to use ourselves, ”said Frister Haveman, CEO and co-founder.

“This round of funding is a great signal of confidence in our team and strategy, especially because our investors are also avid users of the Gain.pro platform.”

Founded in 2018, Gain.pro’s clients include industry-leading investors such as CVC, Cinven and Bain Capital, M&A Advisors Lazard, Rothschild and Perella Weinberg.

“These additional investments allow us to aggressively scale both our global reach and our commercial and engineering teams,” said Nicola Ebmeyer, CCO and co-founder of Gain.pro.

“This increase is an important step towards fulfilling our mission so that every investor and advisor can find, understand and track companies that are important to them.”

The last round brought the total funding of the startup to $ 10 million.

Among the competitors – Connectd, which brings together startups and investors. Recently raised 1.2 million pounds of sowing funding last month.


Investor tool Gain.pro raises £8m for industry tracking platform

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