BT customers are sent text messages as part of the deployment of a controversial telephone system that could potentially put millions of vulnerable people at risk if it crashes

BT is sending text messages to customers as part of the deployment of a controversial telephone system that could potentially put millions of vulnerable people at risk if it goes to an accident.

After an investigation late last year by The Mail on Sunday, which revealed serious flaws in technology, the telecoms giant was forced to make an awkward reversal.

He has postponed plans to move all 29 million homes in the UK to so-called “digital voice” phone lines. Our investigation was praised by telecoms regulator Ofcom for showing how not to contact 999 emergency services via a digital voice system in the event of a power outage, as the phones only run on electricity.

Bad omen: Earlier this month, BT sent customers text messages about a digital voice program that said, “We want to make sure you’re ready to move.”

It is estimated that 1.5 million homes that are not online also remain tall and dry, as phones also need to be plugged into broadband.

BT wants to replace old copper telephone lines with Internet cables so that all calls are made using Voice Protocol (VoIP) instead of analog signals.

Earlier this month, BT sent customers text messages about the digital voice program: “We want to make sure you’re ready to move.”

Customers were asked to answer “READY” to confirm the switch – or visit the “We are translating you to digital voice” website. Relocation dates are not specified.

BT is offering free phones to households before the change fits into the new system, as many old phones will become obsolete.

BT says that the bills will not grow as a result. Dennis Reed of the Silver Voices Elderly campaign group asks, “What if you want to call an ambulance and the phone line doesn’t work? This technology is dangerous and can cost lives. ”

BT said it had “suspended the forced migration of customers”, but acknowledged “some exceptions”, adding: “We were wrong, we went too early”. We strive to restart the program as soon as we are more confident that the right products and solutions are in place. ”

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