A millennial who lamented having to go to work has now said he is “no longer an employee” after his video went viral and sparked a backlash online.

Lucas originally posted the video to TikTok complaining about going to work every day and waking up every morning saying “f*** it”.

His video has been viewed more than 107,000 times and has divided social media users, with some calling him a ‘princess’ and telling him to ‘track’.

Lucas then posted the following video, showing that his complaint got attention not only online, but also from his superiors.

A millennial who lamented having to go to work has revealed he no longer has a job after his video went viral and sparked backlash online

Lucas originally posted a video on TikTok complaining about having to go to work every day and waking up every morning saying

Lucas originally posted a video on TikTok complaining about having to go to work every day and waking up every morning saying “f*** it”

“Congratulations, I’m no longer an employee,” he says.

“I have a lot more exciting things going on.”

“I’m so confused why they care so much, why I don’t like going to work,” he says.

“I know a lot of people who hate going to work. I’m not alone.”

However, the exact truth about Lucas’ role in the company is murky.

Hours after being approached for comment, Auswide, which is run by Lucas’ father, told Daily Mail Australia that Lucas was not an employee, that he had shares in the company and that he had made the post as a joke.

His posts sparked a fierce intergenerational debate about the work ethic of millennials.

Commentator Joe Hildebrand told the young man to “shut up” during a television segment this week.

The Gen X’er said being in the “wedge generation” means he has to deal with boomers who “can’t work and iPhone” and millennials who were “lazy little virgins”.

“All we did was get a job and not complain,” the host said of his generation.

“You’re both screwed. You are both useless. We become CEOs and execute it. We’re paying for both of you.’

Presenter Paul Murray added: “Welcome back to work mate.”

Pictured: Joe Hildebrand

Joe Hildebrand (left) told a millennial who complained about his daily commute (right) to “shut up” and claimed his generation was paying for “everything”

“We all have wonderful jobs, but in the real world, people feel this way every day.”

Hildebrand said he knows it can be difficult to take a job that isn’t “spiritually fulfilling” or “aligned with your ethical values.”

“We know all this, we really do, but we don’t care,” he said. “So shut up and get to work. Because we pay for everything because we are Generation X.”

In the original video, Lucas shared his candid views on work on social media with the caption: “Sorry, maybe this isn’t the motivation you need today.”

The video begins with Lucas wearing his seat belt while sitting in the driver’s seat.

In a video posted on social media, young worker Lucas (pictured) lamented his job satisfaction, asking viewers if anyone enjoyed going to work

In a video posted on social media, young worker Lucas (pictured) lamented his job satisfaction, asking viewers if anyone enjoyed going to work

“Does anyone actually enjoy going to work? “I wake up every day and I’m like, ‘Fuck it,'” Lucas said.

Lucas sarcastically ends his rant about work by complaining about his job satisfaction.

“I’ve never left work and thought today was such a good day,” he said.

The video posted on the TikTok account has more than 106,000 views, and Boomers are rejecting Millennial views on work.

“Smoke, princess, you’re still 65-70 years old,” one user commented.

“Gotta appreciate what you got bro, some people don’t get a job opportunity,” another user wrote.

“Be thankful you have a job, I’ve been trying to find a job for a year and people complaining about their jobs are screwing me up to no end,” said a third.

Lucas (pictured left and right) divided the audience, with many arguing that the millennial should either quit or be grateful to have a job

Most users said they liked the job and suggested that the disgruntled worker change careers.

“Because you’re working at a job you don’t like. Throw it away and find a new one you like,” wrote one user.

“Change jobs and stop complaining,” commented another.

This is not the first time that a quarrel between different generations of workers has erupted on social media.

Corporate trainer Cathy McKenzie previously told Daily Mail Australia that the number one thing young workers despise is being unnecessarily told what to do by their senior bosses.

She added that the problem is exacerbated when baby boomers share obvious destinations with younger employees — especially women.

Diana, 66, said Boomers aren't the problem - it's just that Millennials, Gen Y and Z are soft

Diana, 66, said Boomers aren’t the problem – it’s just that Millennials, Gen Y and Z are soft

Boomers are hitting back at the “lazy” Millennials, Generation Y and Z by complaining about working conditions, calling the generation “weak babies” who have no idea about the real world.

“Young people are leaving jobs because they’d rather sit at home on Centrelink payments than do real work,” commented Diane, 66, as the issue sparked a heated online debate.

“I worked with young managers and those who are already far past retirement age. Wit is a defect found in all age groups.

“If your boss lacks this quality, you will be miserable at work, regardless of his/her age.

“It’s easier to blame an entire generation for its troubles than to take responsibility for wrong choices. It is also spineless and devoid of substance.’

Another said: “So these whiny weaklings who quit their jobs go back to mummy and daddy?” How do they support themselves?”

A third wrote: “One day this generation will rule. We are all doomed.”

Others pointed out that the complaints of the “me, me and me” generation are “a bit rich” coming from a group of people who go out of their way to be offended and then post “themselves crying on social media” about it.

Amy Halvorsen, 33, quit her job as a nurse after being abused by her bosses

Amy Halvorsen, 33, quit her job as a nurse after being mistreated by her superiors

Disgruntled employees are quitting in droves and causing staff shortages in some of Australia’s most important industries, including the health sector, in what has been described as a “big redundancies”.

A mass exodus of workers fed up with their chosen careers, combined with a sharp slowdown in immigration from abroad, are two key factors behind the 50-year low unemployment rate, which now stands at 3.9 percent.

The extent of the problem worrying bosses was revealed in the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ latest jobs report, with 423,500 jobs remaining unfilled.

Among the sectors most affected by staff shortages is the healthcare sector, with 20,000 ‘burnt out’ nurses leaving the workforce last year.

One of those who quit, Amy Halvorsen, said there was a “huge disconnect” between the nurses on the floor and management.

The 33-year-old started working as a nurse in 2017 and was on the frontline of the Covid outbreak, working in the neurology and trauma wards at Westmead Hospital in Sydney.

Among the sectors most affected by staff shortages is the health sector with 20,000 'burnt out' nurses leaving last year (Ms Halvorsen pictured during an interview)

Among the sectors most affected by staff shortages is the health sector with 20,000 ‘burnt out’ nurses leaving last year (Ms Halvorsen pictured during an interview)

“Throughout 2021, there was very little staff, and as new waves of the virus kept coming, there was just no respite,” she said.

“Once the beds finally start emptying, we’re going to be hit by another wave and there’s no plan from the health department or the government to fix it.

“They just see the numbers and the goals and the percentages, not what the medical staff is going through,” she said.

New data makes it clear that Australia is experiencing the Great Retirement phenomenon, with the ABS revealing that the number of people who quit to change jobs or pursue business opportunities is now far greater than the number of people being made redundant or made redundant.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10992861/Millennial-whinged-working-day-viral-TikTok-no-longer-job.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490

Previous articleHuge fine for Cardiff woman for 33 speeding offenses | United Kingdom | News
Next articleLegal & General hails a “good start” to 2022 thanks to strong all-round performance